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Cognitive impairment in major depressive disorder (MDD), including remitted major depressive disorder, raises the question whether these cognitive defects are part of preexisting vulnerability or a consequence of the disorder or its treatment. The purpose of this study was to compare (via meta-analysis) … Continue reading

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https://www.nature.com/immersive/d41586-018-07683-5/index.html

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“The ApoE ε4 allele is the most significant genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer disease. The risk conferred by ε4, however, differs across populations, with populations of African ancestry showing lower ε4 risk compared to those of European or Asian ancestry. The … Continue reading

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Revealing the brain’s molecular architecture The PsychENCODE Consortium Science  14 Dec 2018: Vol. 362, Issue 6420, pp. 1262-1263 DOI: 10.1126/science.362.6420.1262 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6420/1262/tab-pdf BRAIN_DEC_2018issue    

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The following report describes how microglia in the brain might have a role in the cognitive impairment (“chemobrain”) seen after chemotherapy cancer treatment. “…Some chemotherapies cause a lasting condition known as ‘chemobrain’, which is marked by deficiencies in attention, information … Continue reading

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Excerpts from article: “The observation that higher rates of schizophrenia and other nonaffective psychotic disorders are associated with city living is robustly replicated across epidemiologic studies conducted throughout Northern Europe and North America. The weight of this evidence, combined with exhaustive … Continue reading

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Abstract:  “Most people with bipolar disorder spend a significant percentage of their lifetime experiencing either subsyndromal depressive symptoms or major depressive episodes, which contribute greatly to the high levels of disability and mortality associated with the disorder. Despite the importance of bipolar depression, there are … Continue reading

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Abstract: “The discovery of the mechanisms underlying light-gated ion channels called channel rhodospins and the subsequent development of optogenetics illustrates how breakthroughs in science and technology can span multiple levels of scientific inquiry. Our knowledge of how channelrhodopsins work emerged … Continue reading

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Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with increased mortality, but the causes of this increase are poorly understood. This study by Isomura and colleagues examined whether OCD is associated with increased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular complications. Subjects diagnosed with OCD (n = 25,415) were identified and studied … Continue reading

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Abstract: “Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable childhood behavioral disorder affecting 5% of children and 2.5% of adults. Common genetic variants contribute substantially to ADHD susceptibility, but no variants have been robustly associated with ADHD. We report a … Continue reading

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